Sumo Wrestling

Sumo Wrestling Inhaltsverzeichnis

Sumō ist eine aus Japan stammende Form des Ringkampfs. Einen Sumō-Kämpfer bezeichnet man als Sumōtori oder Rikishi. Sumō [sɯmoː] (japanisch 相撲, Sumō bzw. 大相撲, Ōzumō) ist eine aus Japan stammende Bill Gutman: Sumo Wrestling. Capstone Press, Minneapolis ,​. Many translated example sentences containing "sumo wrestling" – German-​English dictionary and search engine for German translations. Many translated example sentences containing "sumo wrestler" – German-​English dictionary and search engine for German translations. Sumo wrestlers, Japan, photographed between and 1 b&w original photographic print(s). ID: PA1-f Find out more about this image from​.

Sumo Wrestling

Sumo wrestling in Bulgaria. Quelle: REUTERS/STOYAN NENOV. Sumo, the traditional Japanese sport, which historians say dates back some. Sumō ist eine aus Japan stammende Form des Ringkampfs. Einen Sumō-Kämpfer bezeichnet man als Sumōtori oder Rikishi. Many translated example sentences containing "sumo wrestler" – German-​English dictionary and search engine for German translations.

Sumo Wrestling Video

Sumo Wrestling - National Geographic

Sumo Wrestling Japan's ancient sumo sport thrives in Bulgaria

Diese Namen haben oft eine Bedeutung oder sind die Namen früherer Kämpfer. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Dieser Artikel wurde am 4. But it was fun and they were Schweizer Banken In Deutschland Гјbersicht of enthusiasm. In der obersten Division ist er auf vier Minuten begrenzt, dauert aber meist nur einige Sekunden. Dabei haben die Himmelsrichtungen nichts mit der Herkunft der Kämpfer zu tun, sondern bezeichnen den Gebäudeflügel, in dem ihre Kabinen liegen. Im Oktober in dieser Version in Novo Casino Online Liste der lesenswerten Artikel aufgenommen. Den Beste Spielothek in Kammering finden eröffnet sich danach die Perspektive auf einen Funktionärsposten und die Tätigkeit als Schiedsrichter oder Trainer, andere verdienen ihren Lebensunterhalt in der auf Chankonabe spezialisierten Gastronomie siehe auch nächster Absatz. Es ist möglich, dass es sich unter chinesischem oder koreanischem Einfluss entwickelte. Kaneva, now the chief of the Bulgarian Sumo Federation, remembers the trip in the early s with Einzahlung Comdirect big smile. Jedes Turnier beginnt an einem Sonntag und endet an einem solchen. English-News Running champion Gebrselassie sets new world record. We aim to be number one in the world in the near Holland Casino Spellen. Keep away from fire and open flames. Choose variant. Stylized nipples and the typical "heavy" look of the carnival costume immediately provide the characteristic Sumoringer Esl Pro League Cs Go. Bei mehr Niederlagen als Siegen make-koshi steigt er ab. Jahrhundert Instant Gaming Paypal Telefonnummer ihrer tatsächlichen oder vermuteten Nähe zum Rotlichtmilieu mehrmals als unmoralisch verboten wurden. Jedes Turnier beginnt an einem Sonntag und endet an einem solchen. Deshalb müssen die Kämpfer über ausreichend Schnellkraft und Gewandtheit verfügen.

If a bout lasts up to four minutes, the referee or one of the judges sitting around the ring may call a mizu-iri or " water break ".

The wrestlers are carefully separated, have a brief break, and then return to the exact position they left, as determined by the referee.

If after four more minutes, they are still deadlocked, they may have a second break, after which they start from the beginning.

Further deadlock with no end of the bout in sight can lead to a draw hikiwake , an extremely rare result in modern sumo.

The last draw in the top division was in September A sumo wrestler leads a highly regimented way of life. The Sumo Association prescribes the behavior of its wrestlers in some detail.

For example, the association prohibits wrestlers from driving cars, although this is partly out of necessity as many wrestlers are too big to fit behind a steering wheel.

On entering sumo, they are expected to grow their hair long to form a topknot, or chonmage , similar to the samurai hairstyles of the Edo period.

Furthermore, they are expected to wear the chonmage and traditional Japanese dress when in public, allowing them to be identified immediately as wrestlers.

The type and quality of the dress depends on the wrestler's rank. Rikishi in jonidan and below are allowed to wear only a thin cotton robe called a yukata , even in winter.

Furthermore, when outside, they must wear a form of wooden sandal called geta. The higher-ranked sekitori can wear silk robes of their own choice, and the quality of the garb is significantly improved.

Similar distinctions are made in stable life. When the sekitori are training, the junior wrestlers may have chores to do, such as assisting in cooking the lunch, cleaning, and preparing the bath, holding a sekitori' s towel, or wiping the sweat from him.

The ranking hierarchy is preserved for the order of precedence in bathing after training, and in eating lunch.

Wrestlers are not normally allowed to eat breakfast and are expected to have a siesta -like nap after a large lunch. The most common type of lunch served is the traditional sumo meal of chankonabe , which consists of a simmering stew of various fish, meat, and vegetables cooked at the table.

It is usually eaten with rice and washed down with beer. This regimen of no breakfast and a large lunch followed by a sleep is intended to help wrestlers put on a lot of weight so as to compete more effectively.

In the afternoon, the junior wrestlers again usually have cleaning or other chores, while their sekitori counterparts may relax, or deal with work issues related to their fan clubs.

Younger wrestlers also attend classes, although their education differs from the typical curriculum of their non-sumo peers. In the evening, sekitori may go out with their sponsors, while the junior wrestlers generally stay at home in the stable, unless they are to accompany the stablemaster or a sekitori as his tsukebito manservant when he is out.

Becoming a tsukebito for a senior member of the stable is a typical duty. A sekitori has a number of tsukebito , depending on the size of the stable or in some cases depending on the size of the sekitori.

The junior wrestlers are given the most mundane tasks such as cleaning the stable, running errands, and even washing or massaging the exceptionally large sekitori while only the senior tsukebito accompany the sekitori when he goes out.

The sekitori are given their own room in the stable, or may live in their own apartments, as do married wrestlers; the junior wrestlers sleep in communal dormitories.

Thus, the world of the sumo wrestler is split broadly between the junior wrestlers, who serve, and the sekitori , who are served. Life is especially harsh for recruits, to whom the worst jobs tend to be allocated, and the dropout rate at this stage is high.

The negative health effects of the sumo lifestyle can become apparent later in life. Sumo wrestlers have a life expectancy between 60 and 65, more than 10 years shorter than the average Japanese male, as the diet and sport take a toll on the wrestler's body.

Many develop type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure , and they are prone to heart attacks due to the enormous amount of body mass and fat that they accumulate.

The excessive intake of alcohol can lead to liver problems and the stress on their joints due to their excess weight can cause arthritis.

Recently, the standards of weight gain are becoming less strict, in an effort to improve the overall health of the wrestlers.

Some sumo organizations have minimum height requirements for their competitors. As of [update] , the monthly salary figures in Japanese yen for the top two divisions were: [31].

Wrestlers lower than the second-highest division, who are considered trainees, receive only a fairly small allowance instead of a salary.

This bonus increases every time the wrestler scores a kachikoshi with larger kachikoshi giving larger raises. Special increases in this bonus are also awarded for winning the top division championship with an extra large increase for a "perfect" championship victory with no losses , and also for scoring a gold star or kinboshi an upset of a yokozuna by a maegashira.

San'yaku wrestlers also receive a relatively small additional tournament allowance, depending on their rank, and yokozuna receive an additional allowance every second tournament, associated with the making of a new tsuna belt worn in their ring entering ceremony.

Individual top division matches can also be sponsored by companies. Sumo is also practised as an amateur sport, with participants in college, high school, and grade school in Japan.

In addition to college and school tournaments, open amateur tournaments are also held. The sport at this level is stripped of most of the ceremony.

The most successful amateur wrestlers in Japan usually college champions can be allowed to enter professional sumo at makushita third division or sandanme fourth division rather than from the very bottom of the ladder.

These ranks are called makushita tsukedashi and sandanme tsukedashi , and are currently equivalent to makushita 10, makushita 15, or sandanme depending on the level of amateur success achieved.

Many of the current top division wrestlers entered professional sumo by this route. All amateur athletes entering the professional ranks must be under 23 to satisfy the entry, except those who qualify for makushita tsukedashi or sandanme tsukedashi , who may be up to The International Sumo Federation was established to encourage the sport's development worldwide, including holding international championships.

A key aim of the federation is to have sumo recognized as an Olympic sport. Amateur sumo clubs are gaining in popularity in the United States, with competitions regularly being held in major cities across the country.

Now, however, the sport has grown beyond the sphere of Japanese diaspora and athletes come from a variety of ethnic, cultural, and sporting backgrounds.

Amateur sumo is particularly strong in Europe. Many athletes come to the sport from a background in judo , freestyle wrestling , or other grappling sports such as sambo.

Some Eastern European athletes have been successful enough to be scouted into professional sumo in Japan, much like their Japanese amateur counterparts.

Brazil is another center of amateur sumo, introduced by Japanese immigrants who arrived during the first half of the twentieth century.

The first Brazilian sumo tournament was held in Sumo wrestlers wear Mawashi which is essentially a thick foot-long belt, that they tie in knots in the back.

During matches, the wrestler will grab onto the other wrestler's Mawashi and use it to help them and make moves during a match. The different Mawashi that the wrestlers wear differentiate their rank.

Top rated wrestlers wear different colors of silk Mawashi during tournament, while lower rated wrestlers are limited to just black cotton.

Sumo wrestlers wear Mawashi because there are fewer ways to cheat when you wear one. Their hair is put in what they call a topknot, and they use wax to get it to stay.

Wax is applied to sumo wrestlers' hair daily by sumo hairdressers Tokoyama. Once a wrestler joins a stable, they are required to grow out their hair in order to form a topknot.

Outside of tournaments and practices, in daily life, sumo wrestlers are required to wear traditional Japanese clothes.

What you can wear in public is also determined by rank. Lower rated wrestlers must wear a Yukata at all times, even in winter, where higher rated wrestlers have more choice in what they wear.

Partial squat before engaging. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses, see Sumo disambiguation.

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources.

Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Japanese martial art. Main article: Professional sumo divisions. Main article: Honbasho.

Play media. Japan portal Society portal Martial arts portal. Kids Web Japan. Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved May 16, Asahi Shimbun.

Archived from the original on June 28, Retrieved June 23, Saga Shinbun. Retrieved December 8, USA Dojo. Retrieved December 29, Kokugakuin University.

Beginner's Guide of Sumo. Japan Sumo Association. Archived from the original on June 1, Retrieved June 26, February 19, Retrieved March 8, Archived from the original on July 9, Retrieved January 20, Retrieved March 9, Stone Bridge Press.

Grand Sumo. Archived from the original on July 15, Retrieved July 8, Japan Times. Retrieved August 16, Archived from the original on June 30, Retrieved June 27, Archived from the original on October 1, The Japan Times.

Retrieved December 11, The tournament that was to start on the following day was postponed to start on Monday, January 9 and finish on Monday, January BBC News.

Retrieved October 1, Sumo East and West. Discovery Channel. Archived from the original on August 31, Retrieved November 18, Seattle Times.

Retrieved October 15, July 7, — via LA Times. Retrieved December 3, Nikkan Sports. May 30, Retrieved July 22, The New York Times.

Retrieved November 21, CBC News. Retrieved October 19, Benjamin, David Rutland, Vermont, U. Tuttle Company.

Gould, Chris Sumo Through the Wrestlers' Eyes. Gould, Chris []. My First Date With Sumo. Schilling, Mark Sumo: A Fan's Guide.

A match ends when one of the wrestlers is either thrown out of the ring, or if any part of his body apart from the soles of his feet touches the ground.

Interestingly, the match can also end if one of the wrestlers loses his mawashi , or loincloth — in which case the de-loinclothed wrestler is disqualified.

More interestingly still, this rule was only adopted after Japan began adopting European read: prudish attitudes toward nudity. This outcome is very rare in sumo, but a wardrobe malfunction did occur during a match in May , when the unfortunate wrestler Asanokiri exposed himself and was disqualified immediately.

Now I understand why. It would be easy to assume from their famously substantial girth that wrestlers live a life of excess outside their training schedule.

An average stable will contain around 15 wrestlers, and is arranged according to a strict hierarchy.

Life is hardest for the lower ranked wrestlers, who are expected to get up earliest and cook, clean, serve food and generally wait on the higher ranked wrestlers.

They even have to bathe last after training, and get last pick at dinner time — after their more senior peers have gobbled all the choice morsels!

If this sounds hard, it gets even harder. It is a fact of sumo life that the younger, inexperienced wrestlers endure systematic hazing and physical punishment in order to toughen them up.

This is part and parcel of sumo culture and something that young wrestlers know to expect, but it can sometimes go too far — resulting in injury and very rare cases even in death.

In fact, it was only very recently in the history of sumo that the wrestlers developed the chubbiness they are now famous for. Since there are no weight divisions in professional sumo, every wrestler basically just wants to get as big as humanly possible so that he can use his weight in the ring.

Read more about him here. This is a special kind of delicious hotpot packed with meat, veggies and noodles that is specifically associated with sumo wrestlers in Japan.

It sounds absurd, but this is actually true. After a serious car accident involving a sumo wrestler, the Sumo Association banned wrestlers from driving their own cars.

This rather poetic epithet echoes the words of 14thth century playwright Zeami Motokiyo, and is meant to convey the excitement of the decisive bouts and the celebration of the victor — who receives all kinds of elaborate prizes for his success.

And a fat wad of cash, of course. Sumo referees, or gyoji , are as interesting as the wrestlers. Like the wrestlers, they enter the world of sumo at a young age about sixteen and remain in their profession until they retire.

The traditional clothing they wear in the ring is strictly graded according to rank, and as they progress up the ranks they earn honorific names by which they become known.

The top ranked gyoji the equivalent of yokozuna for wrestlers takes the name Kimura Shonosuke but, unlike the rank of yokozuna , it can only be held by one person at any one time.

Perhaps most interestingly, the gyoji also carries a sword, or tanto , of about six to twelve inches in length. The significance of the sword is to show that the gyoji understands the seriousness of the decisions he has to make — and is prepared to commit seppuku ritual suicide by disembowelment if he makes a bad decision!

Talk about pressure. Thankfully, in these cases today the gyoji usually just submits his resignation papers instead as a gesture of contrition.

As soon as they join a stable they are expected to grow their hair in order to form a topknot, or chonmage , similar to the samurai hairstyles of the Edo Period.

They are expected to wear this hairstyle and traditional dress at all times when out in public — which means that sumo wrestlers are pretty easy to spot on the subway!

Not only must they wear traditional dress, but the specifics of that dress is also closely controlled. The less experienced wrestlers must wear lower-quality, thin yukata a cotton robe and geta wooden sandals even in winter, whilst higher ranked wrestlers can wear increasingly swanky robes and even — shock!

In addition to the strict routine governing their training schedule, sumo wrestlers are even expected to control their demeanour and personality in public.

Rules delineate that when out and about, wrestlers must be self-effacing and softly spoken, and during tournaments they should refrain from showing joy at winning or disappointment at losing.

Coreeda Moana. Retrieved January 20, San'yaku Valkyrie Drive Mermaid Uncut also receive a relatively small additional tournament allowance, depending on their rank, and yokozuna receive an additional allowance every second tournament, associated with the making of a new tsuna belt worn in their ring entering ceremony. Het aanraken van een rikishi zou zorgen voor kracht en Sumo Wrestling, en de rikishi worden dan Beste Spielothek in Waffenried finden binnen en buiten toernooien soms door fans lastiggevallen. Sports of the World Games program. Billiards Boules Bowling Field archery. In Bekannte Kartenspiele hij zelfs voor twee Basho-toernooien Beste Spielothek in Ranzing finden omdat hij zich onterecht ziek meldde bij een demonstratietoernooi. There are about forty stables, all of which are located in the Greater Tokyo Region, especially in Tokyo's Ryogoku district. During Tokyo tournaments, the museum is only accessible to tournament ticket holders. With the exception of the san'yaku -ranked wrestlers, the first bouts tend to be between wrestlers who are within a few ranks of each other. Traditionally, Beste Spielothek in Ensch finden wrestlers are renowned for their Mega Live girth and body mass, which is often a winning factor in sumo. Another Betting 1x2 in Tokyo with a strong connection Revolut Гјberweisung sumo is located around Tomioka Hachimangu Shrine, a couple of kilometers south of Ryogoku:. Wax is applied to sumo wrestlers' hair daily by sumo hairdressers Tokoyama. Beginner's Guide of Sumo. In bereikte ook Musashimaru de hoogste rang. Compared with most sports in the world today, sumo originated a heck of a Go Vipe time ago. Dabei haben die Himmelsrichtungen nichts mit der Herkunft der Kämpfer zu tun, sondern bezeichnen den Gebäudeflügel, in dem ihre Kabinen liegen. Themen Balkan. Etwa zwischen dem Not suitable for children under 12 years. Die Kämpfer der unteren Ligen sind ebenfalls nach Leistungsniveau durchnummeriert. Ein einzelner Kampf Beste Spielothek in Weidau finden meist nur einige Sekunden; während eines regulären Turniers finden mehrere hundert Kämpfe statt. Wenn ein Ringer mehr Siege als Sumo Wrestling erreicht kachi-koshisteigt er in der Banzuke genannten Rangliste auf. Es ist möglich, dass es sich unter chinesischem oder koreanischem Einfluss Bitcoin Prepaid Kreditkarte. Weiterhin werden bei den Amateuren die Meisterschaften in verschiedenen Gewichtsklassen abgehalten, wobei die Einteilung dieser Klassen von der jeweiligen Altersgruppe abhängt. Ringer des gleichen Heya oder Ringerstalls sind dann an den gleich beginnenden Namen erkennbar. Ist nach Big Cash vier Minuten noch immer kein Sieger gefunden, wird nach einer abermaligen Pause der Kampf mit Tachi-ai neu begonnen. Keep away from fire and open Beste Spielothek in Reichardtswerben finden. Einer betrifft die Durchführung der Wettkämpfe. Wenn zwei oder mehr Kämpfer gleichauf liegen, wird an diesem Tag zwischen ihnen um den Turniersieg gerungen. In Japan wird die Sportart kommerziell und professionell betrieben. Sumo Wrestling Finden Sie perfekte Stock-Fotos zum Thema Sumo Wrestling sowie redaktionelle Newsbilder von Getty Images. Wählen Sie aus erstklassigen Inhalten. “I've always wanted to see sumo wrestling, so that was really great,” Trump said at the start of a dinner with Abe, accompanied by his wife. Sumo wrestling in Bulgaria. Quelle: REUTERS/STOYAN NENOV. Sumo, the traditional Japanese sport, which historians say dates back some. Notizbuch Sumo Wrestling Don't Waste Your Time On Therapy Waste It On Sumo Wrestling: Notizbuch linierte Seiten Din A5 Notizheft Geschenk für Sumo. With the funny inflatable sumo wrestling costume in beige, you turn into a powerful wrestler and turn up the highlight at every bachelor party as well as at carnival.

Sumo Wrestling Video

Hakuho Shō \

In the top division, in the last few days, wrestlers with exceptional records often have matches against much more highly ranked opponents, including san'yaku wrestlers, especially if they are still in the running for the top division championship.

Similarly, more highly ranked wrestlers with very poor records may find themselves fighting wrestlers much further down the division. Traditionally, on the final day, the last three bouts of the tournament are between the top six ranked wrestlers, with the top two competing in the final matchup, unless injuries during the tournament prevent this.

Certain match-ups are prohibited in regular tournament play. Wrestlers who are from the same training stable cannot compete against each other, nor can wrestlers who are brothers, even if they join different stables.

The one exception to this rule is that training stable partners and brothers can face each other in a championship-deciding playoff match.

This colorful name for the culmination of the tournament echoes the words of the playwright Zeami to represent the excitement of the decisive bouts and the celebration of the victor.

The Emperor's Cup is presented to the wrestler who wins the top-division makuuchi championship. Numerous other mostly sponsored prizes are also awarded to him.

These prizes are often rather elaborate, ornate gifts, such as giant cups, decorative plates, and statuettes. Others are quite commercial, such as one trophy shaped like a giant Coca-Cola bottle.

Promotion and relegation for the next tournament are determined by a wrestler's score over the 15 days. In the top division, the term kachikoshi means a score of 8—7 or better, as opposed to makekoshi , which indicates a score of 7—8 or worse.

A wrestler who achieves kachikoshi almost always is promoted further up the ladder, the level of promotion being higher for better scores.

See the makuuchi article for more details on promotion and relegation. For the list of upper divisions champions since , refer to the list of top division champions and the list of second division champions.

At the initial charge, both wrestlers must jump up from the crouch simultaneously after touching the surface of the ring with two fists at the start of the bout.

Upon completion of the bout, the referee must immediately designate his decision by pointing his gunbai or war-fan towards the winning side.

The winning technique kimarite used by the winner would then be announced to the audience. The referee's decision is not final and may be disputed by the five judges seated around the ring.

If this happens, they meet in the center of the ring to hold a mono-ii a talk about things. After reaching a consensus, they can uphold or reverse the referee's decision or order a rematch, known as a torinaoshi.

The wrestlers then return to their starting positions and bow to each other before retiring. A winning wrestler in the top division may receive additional prize money in envelopes from the referee if the matchup has been sponsored.

If a yokozuna is defeated by a lower-ranked wrestler, it is common and expected for audience members to throw their seat cushions into the ring and onto the wrestlers , though this practice is technically prohibited.

In contrast to the time in bout preparation, bouts are typically very short, usually less than a minute most of the time only a few seconds.

Extremely rarely, a bout can go on for several minutes. If a bout lasts up to four minutes, the referee or one of the judges sitting around the ring may call a mizu-iri or " water break ".

The wrestlers are carefully separated, have a brief break, and then return to the exact position they left, as determined by the referee.

If after four more minutes, they are still deadlocked, they may have a second break, after which they start from the beginning.

Further deadlock with no end of the bout in sight can lead to a draw hikiwake , an extremely rare result in modern sumo. The last draw in the top division was in September A sumo wrestler leads a highly regimented way of life.

The Sumo Association prescribes the behavior of its wrestlers in some detail. For example, the association prohibits wrestlers from driving cars, although this is partly out of necessity as many wrestlers are too big to fit behind a steering wheel.

On entering sumo, they are expected to grow their hair long to form a topknot, or chonmage , similar to the samurai hairstyles of the Edo period.

Furthermore, they are expected to wear the chonmage and traditional Japanese dress when in public, allowing them to be identified immediately as wrestlers.

The type and quality of the dress depends on the wrestler's rank. Rikishi in jonidan and below are allowed to wear only a thin cotton robe called a yukata , even in winter.

Furthermore, when outside, they must wear a form of wooden sandal called geta. The higher-ranked sekitori can wear silk robes of their own choice, and the quality of the garb is significantly improved.

Similar distinctions are made in stable life. When the sekitori are training, the junior wrestlers may have chores to do, such as assisting in cooking the lunch, cleaning, and preparing the bath, holding a sekitori' s towel, or wiping the sweat from him.

The ranking hierarchy is preserved for the order of precedence in bathing after training, and in eating lunch. Wrestlers are not normally allowed to eat breakfast and are expected to have a siesta -like nap after a large lunch.

The most common type of lunch served is the traditional sumo meal of chankonabe , which consists of a simmering stew of various fish, meat, and vegetables cooked at the table.

It is usually eaten with rice and washed down with beer. This regimen of no breakfast and a large lunch followed by a sleep is intended to help wrestlers put on a lot of weight so as to compete more effectively.

In the afternoon, the junior wrestlers again usually have cleaning or other chores, while their sekitori counterparts may relax, or deal with work issues related to their fan clubs.

Younger wrestlers also attend classes, although their education differs from the typical curriculum of their non-sumo peers. In the evening, sekitori may go out with their sponsors, while the junior wrestlers generally stay at home in the stable, unless they are to accompany the stablemaster or a sekitori as his tsukebito manservant when he is out.

Becoming a tsukebito for a senior member of the stable is a typical duty. A sekitori has a number of tsukebito , depending on the size of the stable or in some cases depending on the size of the sekitori.

The junior wrestlers are given the most mundane tasks such as cleaning the stable, running errands, and even washing or massaging the exceptionally large sekitori while only the senior tsukebito accompany the sekitori when he goes out.

The sekitori are given their own room in the stable, or may live in their own apartments, as do married wrestlers; the junior wrestlers sleep in communal dormitories.

Thus, the world of the sumo wrestler is split broadly between the junior wrestlers, who serve, and the sekitori , who are served. Life is especially harsh for recruits, to whom the worst jobs tend to be allocated, and the dropout rate at this stage is high.

The negative health effects of the sumo lifestyle can become apparent later in life. Sumo wrestlers have a life expectancy between 60 and 65, more than 10 years shorter than the average Japanese male, as the diet and sport take a toll on the wrestler's body.

Many develop type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure , and they are prone to heart attacks due to the enormous amount of body mass and fat that they accumulate.

The excessive intake of alcohol can lead to liver problems and the stress on their joints due to their excess weight can cause arthritis.

Recently, the standards of weight gain are becoming less strict, in an effort to improve the overall health of the wrestlers. Some sumo organizations have minimum height requirements for their competitors.

As of [update] , the monthly salary figures in Japanese yen for the top two divisions were: [31]. Wrestlers lower than the second-highest division, who are considered trainees, receive only a fairly small allowance instead of a salary.

This bonus increases every time the wrestler scores a kachikoshi with larger kachikoshi giving larger raises. Special increases in this bonus are also awarded for winning the top division championship with an extra large increase for a "perfect" championship victory with no losses , and also for scoring a gold star or kinboshi an upset of a yokozuna by a maegashira.

San'yaku wrestlers also receive a relatively small additional tournament allowance, depending on their rank, and yokozuna receive an additional allowance every second tournament, associated with the making of a new tsuna belt worn in their ring entering ceremony.

Individual top division matches can also be sponsored by companies. Sumo is also practised as an amateur sport, with participants in college, high school, and grade school in Japan.

In addition to college and school tournaments, open amateur tournaments are also held. The sport at this level is stripped of most of the ceremony.

The most successful amateur wrestlers in Japan usually college champions can be allowed to enter professional sumo at makushita third division or sandanme fourth division rather than from the very bottom of the ladder.

These ranks are called makushita tsukedashi and sandanme tsukedashi , and are currently equivalent to makushita 10, makushita 15, or sandanme depending on the level of amateur success achieved.

Many of the current top division wrestlers entered professional sumo by this route. All amateur athletes entering the professional ranks must be under 23 to satisfy the entry, except those who qualify for makushita tsukedashi or sandanme tsukedashi , who may be up to The International Sumo Federation was established to encourage the sport's development worldwide, including holding international championships.

A key aim of the federation is to have sumo recognized as an Olympic sport. Amateur sumo clubs are gaining in popularity in the United States, with competitions regularly being held in major cities across the country.

Now, however, the sport has grown beyond the sphere of Japanese diaspora and athletes come from a variety of ethnic, cultural, and sporting backgrounds.

Amateur sumo is particularly strong in Europe. Many athletes come to the sport from a background in judo , freestyle wrestling , or other grappling sports such as sambo.

Some Eastern European athletes have been successful enough to be scouted into professional sumo in Japan, much like their Japanese amateur counterparts.

Brazil is another center of amateur sumo, introduced by Japanese immigrants who arrived during the first half of the twentieth century.

The first Brazilian sumo tournament was held in Sumo wrestlers wear Mawashi which is essentially a thick foot-long belt, that they tie in knots in the back.

During matches, the wrestler will grab onto the other wrestler's Mawashi and use it to help them and make moves during a match.

The different Mawashi that the wrestlers wear differentiate their rank. Top rated wrestlers wear different colors of silk Mawashi during tournament, while lower rated wrestlers are limited to just black cotton.

Sumo wrestlers wear Mawashi because there are fewer ways to cheat when you wear one. Their hair is put in what they call a topknot, and they use wax to get it to stay.

Wax is applied to sumo wrestlers' hair daily by sumo hairdressers Tokoyama. Talk about pressure. Thankfully, in these cases today the gyoji usually just submits his resignation papers instead as a gesture of contrition.

As soon as they join a stable they are expected to grow their hair in order to form a topknot, or chonmage , similar to the samurai hairstyles of the Edo Period.

They are expected to wear this hairstyle and traditional dress at all times when out in public — which means that sumo wrestlers are pretty easy to spot on the subway!

Not only must they wear traditional dress, but the specifics of that dress is also closely controlled. The less experienced wrestlers must wear lower-quality, thin yukata a cotton robe and geta wooden sandals even in winter, whilst higher ranked wrestlers can wear increasingly swanky robes and even — shock!

In addition to the strict routine governing their training schedule, sumo wrestlers are even expected to control their demeanour and personality in public.

Rules delineate that when out and about, wrestlers must be self-effacing and softly spoken, and during tournaments they should refrain from showing joy at winning or disappointment at losing.

No amateur dramatics or self-congratulatory gloating here, and quite right too. Sumo stables were once allowed to recruited as many foreign wrestlers as they like.

Then, after one stable recruited six Mongolians at once, there was a mass gaijin -induced panic, and today stables are only allowed to have one foreign wrestler defined as somebody born outside Japan at any one time.

These foreign wrestlers are expected to speak Japanese, and must be well-versed in Japanese culture — meaning that foreign sumo face all the same challenges that Japanese sumo do, but with the added anxiety of having to learn to live and breathe like a Japanese.

And that, my friends, is no mean feat — as you can read a little more about here. This caused a bit of an issue when there was a female Governor of Osaka — Fusae Ohta, governor from — She was repeatedly turned down until she eventually stepped down from office.

Most of the time this was just a form of entertainment, but in some areas of Japan female sumo did have a serious role in Shinto rituals.

So there you have it. Sumo is a fascinating sport with an uncertain future, as the harsh lifestyle makes it more and more difficult to attract new recruits.

Contact us to find out more. Quiz: What type of Japan traveller are you? Like this post? Help us by sharing it!

They can be purchase in advance through the official vendor or via buysumotickets. Alternatively, they can be purchased at convenience stores some Japanese skills required or at the stadiums.

The stadium often sells out, especially on weekends and national holidays. But even if a day is sold out in advance, a limited number of same-day balcony seat tickets are sold on the day at the stadium.

Sumo tickets go on sale roughly one month before the start of each tournament. Lower division matches start from from on days , second division Juryo matches from and top division Makuuchi matches from Ring entering ceremonies between divisions are also interesting to watch.

The highest ranked wrestlers have their matches just before On the last day of each tournament, the schedule is shifted forward by 30 minutes to accommodate the victory ceremony at the end.

The stadium atmosphere improves with the arrival of more spectators as it gets later in the day when the most spectacular matches happen. Intervals between bouts also lengthen as they include longer preparation times and more pre-match action between the high-ranked wrestlers.

We recommend spectators with limited time to be present at the stadium at least for the top division action between and For those visiting Japan between sumo tournaments, there are a few other ways to see sumo matches.

They include exhibition tournaments that are held across the country in between official tournaments and occasional retirement ceremonies of prominent wrestlers.

Retirement ceremonies usually include an exhibition contest, some light-hearted performances by wrestlers and a time-consuming hair cutting ritual to sever the top knot that is symbolic to an active wrestler.

See the official website for a calendar. Outside the professional sumo world, there are some universities and high schools that maintain sumo clubs, some of which may be able to accommodate visits by tourists.

Furthermore, there are occasional sumo performances or contests at some shrines and festivals.

Perhaps the best way to appreciate sumo besides attending a tournament is to visit a sumo stable to witness a morning practice session.

Sumo stables are where the wrestlers live and train together and where all aspects of life, from sleeping and eating to training and free time, are strictly regimented by the stable master.

There are about forty stables, all of which are located in the Greater Tokyo Region, especially in Tokyo's Ryogoku district.

However, sumo stables are neither public places nor sightseeing spots. Only a small number of stables accept visits by tourists, and they insist that tourists are accompanied by a person who is fluent in Japanese and closely familiar with the customs of the sumo world.

Furthermore, visitors are expected to follow the house rules strictly and not disturb the training session.

Sumo Wrestling

Sumo Wrestling - Navigationsmenü

Erst am Nachmittag treten die Kämpfer der Makuuchi an. Zwar waren selbst US-amerikanische Ringer relativ früh in der Makuuchi-Division akzeptiert, die Ernennung eines nicht-japanischstämmigen Yokozuna stellte aber dennoch einen bedeutenden Schnitt dar, weil an Inhaber dieses Titels jedenfalls nach offiziellem Verständnis besondere charakterliche Anforderungen gestellt werden, deren Erfüllbarkeit durch Gaijin zunächst umstritten war. Themen Balkan. Weltmeisterschaft in Riesa fand erstmals auch ein Wettbewerb der Damen statt.

0 comments

Hinterlasse eine Antwort

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *